• Sarapiquí es Naturaleza

    Naturaleza viva. En su forma más pura. Es Pura Vida. Es Costa Rica. Es estar en conexión plena con el ambiente. El ambiente entero. Es recibir estímulos. Por todos…


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  • Sloth Journals | Part II

    Stevie, Female 2-Fingered Sloth “I’m a gonna bite ya!” Age: ~ One year Current Weight: 2.9 kg Place of Origin: Guápiles


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  • Sloth Journals | Part II

    Bilbo, Male 2-Fingered Sloth “Don’t worry, man, everything’s cool.” Age: ~ One year and two months (probably a few…


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  • Sloth Journals | Part II

    Gimli, Male Two-Fingered Sloth “Come here and say that to my face!” Age: ~ One year and one month Current Weight: 3 kg


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  • The Release Site Survival Guide

    We asked our Release Site team to…


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  • Australian looking for “Pura Vida”

    My name is Georgie and I come from the Wollongong region of Australia. For all the non-Aussies out there, that’s Wool-on-gong, a Wodi-Wodi Aboriginal word referring to the city’s…


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  • From Across the Pond & Into the Jungle

    So, my name is Alice, I’m your average 26-year-old British girl. I’ve been working with animals for half a decade as a zoo presenter, zookeeper, and more recently (for…


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  • Tabu the Endangered Oncilla

    The Oncilla (Leopardus tigrinus) sometimes referred to as a tiger cat, is one of the smallest felid species in the Americas. Their coat is typically a light brown colour with dark brown/black splotches as such they are often mistaken for Margays or Ocelot although they are considerably smaller weighing on average 1.5 to 3 kg. Oncillas live nocturnal lives in thick vegetation, making them difficult to find and thus little is known about their lives. They are good climbers however they typically hunt ground-dwelling prey, mostly small rodents but also lizards, birds and invertebrates. Studies have shown that in areas with a higher concentration of larger cats eg. Ocelots and Pumas the Oncillas became more active during the daytime, possibly to minimise competition. Oncillas are considered vulnerable by the IUCN with threats including poaching for its fur and deforestation for coffee plantations, cattle ranching and agriculture. In the wild Oncillas have a lifespan of about 11 years, however they have been know to survive up to 20 years in captivity. Oncillas are rarely found in captivity with only 2 individuals, both male, in captivity Costa Rica. Tabu is thought to have originally been kept as a pet, however he is now able to relax in the sun and practise his stalking skills as a resident at the Toucan Rescue Ranch. By former intern Katie Grant


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  • A Fiery-Billed & Collared Aracari

    In my opinion, working at the Ranch is a big responsibility and also a big pleasure. Seeing an animal grow stronger each passing day and recuperate from a bad situation is definitely a calling. This is what happened with two of our residents, the collared aracari and the fiery billed aracari. The collared aracari that joined us in February, had just escaped from being kept as a pet.  His situation was evident. His back feathers were a dull gray compared to the iridescent black of a wild specimen.  His chest was a pale white instead of the almost neon yellow characteristic to his species, and his beak was discolored as if drained of life. He started recuperating almost immediately. The protein we provided in his new diet and the attention he received started slowly turning his plumage brighter and brighter, until the day came when he finally was allowed outside the clinic and into a big enclosure with his own species. The transition process didn't go so well though. The other collared aracaris weren't so keen on accepting our little friend, so he was sent back to the clinic. That changed when we saw him interacting with another fiery-billed aracari who was also in the clinic. Hopeful plans were made as we put both aracaris into an  enclosure of their own. Happily, they’ve accepted each other and now share this wonderful living space together at TRR.   By former volunteer Andres Saenz Brautigam 


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  • Izzy Makes a New Friend

    It's difficult to not fear monkeys after being chased down by a group of macaque monkeys at the tender age of seven and, then again at the age of 20, being trapped in a bathroom by a large male patiently waiting for me outside the door. Needless to say, I've been traumatized by monkeys and held a fear for them my whole life. So you can imagine the day I arrived at the Toucan Rescue Ranch to see adult spider monkeys. I was quite surprised and very nervous. A few weeks went by and I plucked up the courage to begin helping with the spider monkeys morning and afternoon feeding. If I got a little too close, both Izzy and Noelia would reach through and grab chunks of my hair, taking my dignity with it. I was determined at this stage to conquer my fear and decided I would slowly work towards gaining their trust. In the afternoons, I would take them treats and after a period of time they started to warm up to me- Izzy in particular. I am now at the point where Izzy will anticipate my arrival at the enclosure and she will come down to greet me, following me as I manage their feeding and care. I've learnt that spider monkeys are very intelligent and can sense fear in people. As my fear disappeared the bond between us grew and I'm very grateful for having had this special time with her here at the Ranch. You can ADOPT Izzy or animals like her by visiting our ADOPTION page!  By former volunteer Talia Harris | Read more about volunteer's experiences by subscribing to our newsletter! 


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