• 2020 – A Year in Review

    Determination – a noun that kept Toucan Rescue Ranch going throughout 2020. A concept that I used time and time again when the height of the pandemic…


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  • Internship Program Suspended until 2021

    INTERNSHIP PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENT  The Toucan Rescue Ranch (TRR) would like to thank you for your interest in our Internship Program. This program allows…


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  • Sarapiquí es Naturaleza

    Naturaleza viva. En su forma más pura. Es Pura Vida. Es Costa Rica. Es estar en conexión plena con el ambiente. El ambiente entero. Es recibir estímulos. Por todos…


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  • Earning the Title “Sloth Dad”

    I wasn’t 100% sure what I was getting into…


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  • The Release Site Survival Guide

    We asked our Release Site team to…


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  • From Across the Pond & Into the Jungle

    So, my name is Alice, I’m your average 26-year-old British girl. I’ve been working with animals for half a decade as a zoo presenter, zookeeper, and more recently (for…


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  • High Schooler Sloths go to College

    Since Toucan Rescue Ranch’s humble beginnings our motto has always been: Rescue. Rehabilitate. Love. Liberate. An axiom that was truly felt on November 9. It was this day that…


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  • Idaho Girl Finds Paradise

    Howdy! I am the Release Site Coordinator at Toucan Rescue Ranch’s Release Site located in Sarapiqui de Heredia, Costa Rica. I’m from Sandpoint, Idaho, a little town located in the Idaho Panhandle, nestled between the Selkirk and Cabinet mountain ranges, alongside Lake Pend Oreille, not far from the Canadian border. I’m happiest when I am outdoors so you’re most likely to find me surfing the snow, blazing trails, or taking a dip in Pend Oreille. In the spring of 2016, I graduated with my B.S. in Business and Communications; I am currently in the process of applying to law school. I plan on studying environmental law, focusing on the conservation of natural resources in hopes of providing representation for individuals, organizations, animals, and our planet, who or which could not otherwise help themselves.  I first learned about TRR from my dear friend Zara Palmer, the TRR Marketing Specialist.  We were both working at a pizza shop atop our local ski hill. Over the course of the season, we shared countless stories and experiences, many of hers about TRR. Inspired by her stories, I applied to volunteer and happily was accepted!!! I remember the months leading up to my arrival at TRR seemed endless.  In July 2016, I packed my bags and spent two months at TRR as a Daily Operations Volunteer. I fell in love, with the animals, the people at the ranch, their mission, Costa Rica - all of it. Needless to say, two months was too short so I went home to save some dough. With little hesitation, I postponed law school for a year and committed to six more months with TRR. However, this time I would be returning as the Release Site Coordinator, an opportunity I am tremendously grateful for.  In this role my primary responsibilities incorporate my business skills as well as my love for animals and nature, they include conducting daily rounds, monitoring all animal care activities, and providing Leslie with regular status reports. My main focus includes implementing approved pre-release plans, monitoring and managing the Toucan Breeding Program, and identifying and communicating abnormal animal behaviors. In addition, I have some exciting projects I want to finish while I’m here. Two of which I am particularly excited about are geared toward sustainability: building a chicken coop and creating a vegetable garden.  Although my time at the Release Site will eventually come to an end, the Toucan Rescue Ranch will forever be with me for it has carved out a place in my heart. And I hope to always be apart of this extraordinary organization for the rest of my time here on planet earth.  By Release Site Coordinator Intern, Kendall Watts  Release Site Photos Captured by Kendall Watts  setREVStartSize({c: 'rev_slider_7_1',rl:[1240,1024,778,480],el:[],gw:[1240],gh:[868],layout:'fullwidth',mh:"0"}); var revapi7, tpj; jQuery(function() { tpj = jQuery; if(tpj("#rev_slider_7_1").revolution == undefined){ revslider_showDoubleJqueryError("#rev_slider_7_1"); }else{ revapi7 = tpj("#rev_slider_7_1").show().revolution({ jsFileLocation:"//toucanrescueranch.org/wp-content/plugins/revslider/public/assets/js/", duration:1000, visibilityLevels:"1240,1024,778,480", gridwidth:1240, gridheight:868, minHeight:"", spinner:"spinner0", responsiveLevels:"1240,1024,778,480", disableProgressBar:"on", shuffle:true, navigation: { onHoverStop:false }, viewPort: { enable:true, visible_area:"20%" }, fallbacks: { allowHTML5AutoPlayOnAndroid:true }, }); } });


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  • Tabu the Endangered Oncilla

    The Oncilla (Leopardus tigrinus) sometimes referred to as a tiger cat, is one of the smallest felid species in the Americas. Their coat is typically a light brown colour with dark brown/black splotches as such they are often mistaken for Margays or Ocelot although they are considerably smaller weighing on average 1.5 to 3 kg. Oncillas live nocturnal lives in thick vegetation, making them difficult to find and thus little is known about their lives. They are good climbers however they typically hunt ground-dwelling prey, mostly small rodents but also lizards, birds and invertebrates. Studies have shown that in areas with a higher concentration of larger cats eg. Ocelots and Pumas the Oncillas became more active during the daytime, possibly to minimise competition. Oncillas are considered vulnerable by the IUCN with threats including poaching for its fur and deforestation for coffee plantations, cattle ranching and agriculture. In the wild Oncillas have a lifespan of about 11 years, however they have been know to survive up to 20 years in captivity. Oncillas are rarely found in captivity with only 2 individuals, both male, in captivity Costa Rica. Tabu is thought to have originally been kept as a pet, however he is now able to relax in the sun and practise his stalking skills as a resident at the Toucan Rescue Ranch. By former intern Katie Grant


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  • TRR Inspired Me to Become a Vet Tech

    Before coming to Costa Rica I was working a full-time desk job and working towards a psychology degree. I had considered changing my degree to something geared toward wildlife rehabilitation but I didn't want to make such a drastic decision without first dipping my toes in the water.  I came to the Toucan Rescue Ranch (TRR) in July, 2016, with a plane ticket to go home exactly 30 days later. That changed about a week into my visit. I immediately fell in love with the ranch and knew that I wanted to stay and contribute here for as long as possible. Spending everyday with these animals gave me something that I had never felt before.  After speaking with some of the veterinarian volunteers, I decided it was time for me to make the change and work towards a degree focused on saving animal lives. TRR has completely inspired and motivated me. The best part about it all is that I get to continue working for the ranch while going to school. The experiences and practice that I see daily at TRR have helped me tremendously in my studies. By intern Mackenzie King | Read these types of articles first on our newsletter! Subscribe today! 


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